Trans Scend Survival

Trans: Latin prefix implying "across" or "Beyond", often used in gender nonconforming situations – Scend: Archaic word describing a strong "surge" or "wave", originating with 15th century english sailors – Survival: 15th century english compound word describing an existence only worth transcending.

…Ever tried to Chrome Remote ➡️ Ubuntu Budgie? xD

Check out this project on my Github over here 🙂

Fully automated patching for Chrome Remote Desktop on Ubuntu Budgie.

Chrome remote desktop is fantastic, but often clashes with Xorg nuances from a variety of desktop environments in Ubuntu. This chrome-remote-desktop script extends and replaces the version automatically installed by Google in /opt/google/chrome-remote-desktop/chrome-remote-desktop. This stuff is only relevant for accessing your Ubuntu machine from elsewhere (e.g. the "server", the client machine should not be installing anything, all it needs is a web browser).

Set up the server:

Before patching anything or pursuing other forms of delightful tomfoolery, follow the installation instructions provided by Google. Set up everything normally- install Google's .deb download with dpkg, set up a PIN, etc.
The trouble comes when you are trying to remote in- some problems you may encounter include:

  • none of the X sessions work, each immediately closing the connection to the client
  • the remote desktop environment crashes or becomes mangled
  • odd scaling issues or flaky resolution changes

Patch it up:

# get this script:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Jesssullivan/chrome-remote-desktop-budgie/master/chrome-remote-desktop

# or:
git clone https://github.com/Jesssullivan/chrome-remote-desktop-budgie/ 
cd chrome-remote-desktop-budgie 

# behold:
python3 chrome-remote-desktop

# ...perhaps, if you are keen (optional):
# sudo chmod u+x addsystemd.sh
# sudo ./addsystemd.sh

What does this do?

We are primarily just enforcing the use of existing instances of X and correct display values as reported by your system.

  • This version keeps a persistent version itself in /usr/local/bin/ in addition updating the one executed by Chrome in /opt/google/chrome-remote-desktop/.
  • A mirror of this script is also maintained at /usr/local/bin/chrome-remote-desktop.github, and will let the user know if there are updates.
  • The version distributed by google is retained in /opt/ too as chrome-remote-desktop.verbatim.
  • Each of these versions are compared by md5 hash- this way our patched version of chrome-remote-desktop will always make sure it is where it should be, even after Google pushes updates and overwrites everything in /opt/.

This, That, etc

....Updated 07/19/2020

Bits & bobs, this & that of late:

...In effort to thwart the recent heat and humidity here in the White Mountains (or, perhaps just to follow the philosophy of circuitous overcomplication... 🙂 ) here are some sketches of quick-release exhaust fittings of mine for a large, wheeled AC & dehumidifier unit (these have been installed throughout my home via window panels).

...Sketching out a severely overcomplicated "computer shelf", rapid-fab style:
(plasma cut / 3d printed four-post server rack == RepRapRack?? xD) 🙂

...Also, Ryan @ V1Engineering recently released his new MPCNC Primo here, should anyone be keen. Long Live the MPCNC! 🙂

...Oodles of fun everyday over in the clipi project- check it out!

...A really short morning metal:

...All Morning Metal tracks here, a couple videos here

xD

clipi CLI!

Find this project on my github here!

...post updated 07/19/2020

An efficient toolset for Pi devices

Emulate, organize, burn, manage a variety of distributions for Raspberry Pi.


Choose your own adventure....

Emulate:
clipi virtualizes many common sbc operating systems with QEMU, and can play with both 32 bit and 64 bit operating systems.

  • Select from any of the included distributions (or add your own to /sources.toml!) and clipi will handle the rest.

Organize:
clipi builds and maintains organized directories for each OS as well a persistent & convenient .qcow2 QEMU disk image.

  • Too many huge source .img files and archives? clipi cleans up after itself under the Utilities... menu.
  • additional organizational & gcc compilation methods are available in /kernel.py

Write:
clipi burns emulations to external disks! Just insert a sd card or disk and follow the friendly prompts. All files, /home, guest directories are written out.

  • Need to pre-configure (or double check) wifi? Add your ssid and password to /wpa_supplicant.conf and copy the file to /boot in the freshly burned disk.
  • Need pre-enabled ssh? copy /ssh to /boot too.
  • clipi provides options for writing from an emulation's .qcow2 file via qemu...
  • ...as well as from the source's raw image file with the verbatim argument

Manage:
clipi can find the addresses of all the Raspberry Pi devices on your local network.

  • Need to do this a lot? clipi can install itself as a Bash alias (option under the Utilities... menu, fire it up whenever you want.

Shortcuts:

Shortcuts & configuration arguments can be passed to clipi as a .toml (or yaml) file.

  • Shortcut files access clipi's tools in a similar fashion to the interactive menu:
# <shortcut>.toml
# you can access the same tools and functions visible in the interactive menu like so:
'Burn a bootable disk image' = true  
# same as selecting in the interactive cli
'image' = 'octoprint'
'target_disk' = 'sdc'  
  • clipi exposes many features only accessible via configuration file arguments, such as distribution options and emulation settings.
# <shortcut>.toml

# important qemu arguments can be provided via a shortcut file like so:
'kernel' = "bin/ddebian/vmlinuz-4.19.0-9-arm64"
'initrd' = "bin/ddebian/initrd.img-4.19.0-9-arm64"

# qemu arguments like these use familiar qemu lexicon:
'M' = "virt" 
'm' = "2048"

# default values are be edited the same way:
'cpu' = "cortex-a53"
'qcow_size' = "+8G"
'append' = '"rw root=/dev/vda2 console=ttyAMA0 rootwait fsck.repair=yes memtest=1"'

# extra arguments can be passed too:
'**args' = """
-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd-root \
-no-reboot -monitor stdio
"""

# additional network arguments can be passed like so:
# (clipi may automatically modify network arguments depending on bridge / SLiRP settings)
'network' = """
-netdev bridge,br=br0,id=net0 \
-device virtio-net-pci,netdev=net0
"""
  • Supply a shortcut file like so:
    python3 clipi.py etc/find_pi.toml

  • take a look in /etc for some shortcut examples and default values

TODOs & WIPs:

bridge networking things:

  • working on guest --> guest, bridge --> host, host only mode networking options.
    as of 7/17/20 only SLiRP user mode networking works,
    see branch broken_bridge-networking
    to see what is currently cooking here

kernel stuff:

  • automate ramdisk & kernel extraction-
    most functions to do so are all ready to go in /kernel.py

  • other random kernel todos-

    • working on better options for building via qemu-debootstrap from chroot instead of debian netboot or native gcc
    • add git specific methods to sources.py for mainline Pi linux kernel
      • verify absolute binutils version
      • need to get cracking on documentation for all this stuff

gcp-io stuff:

  • formalize ddns.py & dockerfile

  • make sure all ports (22, 80, 8765, etc) can up/down as reverse proxy

# clone:
git clone https://github.com/Jesssullivan/clipi
cd clipi

# preheat:
pip3 install -r requirements.txt
# (or pip install -r requirements.txt)

# begin cooking some Pi:
python3 clipi.py

Parse fdisk -l in Python

fdisk -l has got to be one of the more common disk-related commands one might use while fussing about with raw disk images. The fdisk utility is ubiquitous across linux distributions (also brew install gptfdisk and brew cask install gdisk, supposedly). The -l argument provides a quick look raw sector & file system info. Figuring out the Start, End, Sectors, Size, Id, Format of a disk image's contents without needing to mount it and start lurking around is handy, just the sort of thing one might want to do with Python. Lets write a function to get these attributes into a dictionary- here's mine:

import subprocess
import re

def fdisk(image):

    #  `image`, a .img disk image:
    cmd = str('fdisk -l ' + image)

    # read fdisk output- everything `cmd` would otherwise print to your console on stdout
    # is instead piped into `proc`.
    proc = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)

    # the raw stuff from stdout is not parseable as is, so we read into a string:
    result = proc.stdout.read().__str__()

    # figure out what type we should iterate with when looking via file / part contained within image.  I have no idea if anything besides .img will work- YMMV, but YOLO xD
    if '.iso' in result:
        iter = '.iso'
    if '.qcow2' in result:
        iter = '.qcow2'
    else:  
        iter = '.img'

    # chop up fdisk results by file / partition-
    # the resulting `parts` are equivalent to fdisk "rows" in the shell
    parts = re.findall(r'' + iter + r'\d', result)

    # dictionary `disk` contains each "row" from `parts`:
    disk = {}
    for p in parts:
        # sub dictionary 'part' contains the handy fdisk output values:
        part = {}
        # get just the number words with regex sauce:
        line = result.split(p)[1]
        words = re.split(r'\s+', line)
        # place each word into 'part':
        part['Start'] = words[1]
        part['End'] = words[2]
        part['Sectors'] = words[3]
        part['Size'] = words[4]
        part['Id'] = words[5]
        part['Format'] = words[6].split('\\n')[0]
        # stick this part into 'disk', move onto next disk part:
        disk[p] = part
    return disk

Dover’s Enclosure

A stylish demo enclosure for the Xilinx / Digilent Genesys 2 with a display panel.

Check out what Dover Microsystems is up to here:
https://www.dovermicrosystems.com/

Prototyping & production @ the D&M Makerspace- see what else we're up to:
https://makerspace.plymouthcreate.net/

Electronics:

FPGA- Digilent Xilinx Genesys 2 FPGA Reference

The display and HDMI driver board from pimoroni-
The sketch for panel dimensions are shared over here too

BOM for version 6:

You can find the V6 interactive Fusion 360 model over here

...additional V6 svg, stl layouts on tinkercad

Materials:

Size Type
12"x12" 1/4" (6.35mm) clear acrylic sheet
12"x12" 3mm clear acrylic sheet
12"x12" 3mm colored acrylic sheet
~45 grams printer plastic (filament or resin)

Hardware:

Qty Size
3 m3x8
3 m3x18
1 m3x20
7 m3 nut
2 m2x14
2 m2x10
4 m2 nut

What is this thing? Some words from founding scientist @gregsgit:

*"We use the FPGA to prototype / emulate a "Soft Core" CPU with and without Dover's IP (logic) called CoreGuard.
An FPGA can simulate (sometimes called "emulate") logical circuits, and is reprogrammable. So you can design circuitry that eventually will be fabricated in silicon, but you can work out bugs and try different designs using the FPGA "fabric".*

*For demos, we synthesize to the Xilinx FPGA: a design for a RISC-V CPU, a simple UART (serial interface), an interface to the on-board DDR memory and flash memory, and a simple video output. We put some software in the on-board flash, then boot a working RISC-V system. We'll show how the software can be attacked, using I/O over the serial port to mimic what would typically take place over a network connection. Next, we show the same SoC (CPU + UART + memory) with CoreGuard logic added in. We run the same software and then show that the same attack is blocked by CoreGuard. We also use the FPGA to emulate the Arm CPU that we are interfacing with for our NXP customer."*

The eBird API & regionCode

get this script and other GIS bits here on github

The Ebird dataset is awesome. While directly handling data as a massive delimited file- as distributed by the eBird people- is cumbersome at best, the ebird api offers a fairly straightforward and efficient alternative for a few choice bits and batches of data.

  • The eBird AWK tool for filtering the actual delimited data can be found over here:

    install.packages("auk")

It is worth noting R + auk (or frankly any R centered filtering method) will quickly become limited by the single-threaded approach of R, and how you're managing memory as you iterate. Working and querying the data from a proper database quickly becomes necessary.

Most conveniently, the eBird API already exists- snag an key over here.

...The API package for R is over here:
install.packages("rebird")

...There is also a neat Python wrapper over here:
pip3 install ebird-api

Region Codes:

I'm not sure why, but some methods use normal latitude / longitude in decimal degrees while some others use "regionCode", which seems to be some kind of eBird special. Only ever seen this format in ebird data.

For example, recent observations uses regionCode:

# GET Recent observations in a region:
# https://api.ebird.org/v2/data/obs/{{regionCode}}/recent

...But nearby recent observations uses latitude / longitude:

# GET Recent nearby observations:
# https://api.ebird.org/v2/data/obs/geo/recent?lat={{lat}}&lng={{lng}}

Regardless, lets just write a function to convert decimal degrees to this regionCode thing. Here's mine:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
"""
# provide latitude & longitude, return eBird "regionCode"
Written by Jess Sullivan
@ https://transscendsurvival.org/
available at: 
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Jesssullivan/GIS_Shortcuts/master/regioncodes.py
"""
import requests
import json

def get_regioncode(lat, lon):

    # this municipal api is a publicly available, no keys needed afaict
    census_url = str('https://geo.fcc.gov/api/census/area?lat=' +
                     str(lat) +
                     '&lon=' +
                     str(lon) +
                     '&format=json')

    # send out a GET request:
    payload = {}
    get = requests.request("GET", census_url, data=payload)

    # parse the response, all api values are contained in list 'results':
    response = json.loads(get.content)['results'][0]

    # use the last three digits from the in-state fips code as the "subnational 2" identifier:
    fips = response['county_fips']

    # assemble and return the "subnational type 2" code:
    regioncode = 'US-' + response['state_code'] + '-' + fips[2] + fips[3] + fips[4]
    print('formed region code: ' + regioncode)
    return regioncode

Prius, Printers

Add EV only mode button for 2009 Prius-

Pinouts and wiring reference here:
http://www.calcars.org/prius-evbutton-install.pdf

Big shiny EV mode button in the Prius!

Fusion 360 files here: https://a360.co/2zOACJJ

Files uploaded to thingiverse here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4422091

xposted to prius chat too:
https://priuschat.com/threads/3d-printed-ev-mode-button-xd.216774/

PLA & Carbon Polycarbonate button housings:


While we're at it....

See more notes on D&M 3d Printer stuff on github here:
https://github.com/Jesssullivan/Funmat-HT-Notes
...and here:
https://github.com/Jesssullivan/AeroTaz5_hotfix

While at a safe distance…

...Playing with Bandlab's Sonar reboot --> morning metal ....Frankly the whole suite (yes, Melodyne, the whole nine yards) is way better than when it was with the late Cakewalk, and its all free now. PSA!

...Unexpected success with
Nylon 680 FDA {3mm @ .8} for some rather delicate parts:


...Yet another improved pi monitoring sketch, currently in production w/ polycarbonate & 1/4"... ...or to quote Mad-eye Moody, "CONSTANT VIGILANCE!" 🙂

xD

Install Adobe Applications on AWS WorkSpaces

By default, the browser based authentication used by Adobe’s Creative Cloud installers will fail on AWS WorkSpace instances. Neither the installer nor Windows provide much in the way of useful error messages- here is how to do it!

Open Server Manager. Under “Local Server”, open the “Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration”- *(mercy!)* - and turn it off.

Good Lord

##### Tada! The sign on handoff from the installer→Browser→ back to installer will now work fine. xD

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