Trans: Latin prefix implying "across" or "Beyond", often used in gender nonconforming situations – Scend: Archaic word describing a strong "surge" or "wave", originating with 15th century english sailors – Survival: 15th century english compound word describing an existence only worth transcending.

Category: DIY (Page 4 of 6)

Off-Grid File Sharing with SAMBA / GL.iNet

Note:  SMB / SharePoint is surely better with a proper server/computer.  A Raspberry Pi running OpenMediaVault (Debian) is a more common and robust option (still 5v low power).

If you are actually in an "it must done in OpenWRT" scenario, Click Here for my Samba config file: OpenWRT_Samba-config and see below.  Also, please use a NTFS or EX4 format.  🙂

 

...While my sharing method wasn't actually adopted by others, I still think it is good to know!

-Jess

How to Query KML point data as CSV using QGIS and R

How to Query KML point data as CSV using QGIS and R

Here you can see more than 800 points, each describing an observation of an individual bird.  This data is in the form of KML, a sort of XML document from Google for spatial data.

 

I want to know which points have “pair” or “female” in the description text nodes using R.  This way, I can quickly make and update a .csv in Excel of only the paired birds (based on color bands).

 

 

Even if there was a description string search function in Google Earth Pro (or other organization-centric GIS/waypoint software), this method is more

robust, as I can work immediately with the output as a data frame in R, rather than a list of results.

 

First, open an instance of QGIS.  I am running ~2.8 on OSX.  Add a vector layer of your KML.

“Command-A” in the point dialog to select all before import!

Next, under “Vector”, select “Merge vector layers” via Data Management Tools.

 

Select CSV and elect to save the file instead of use a temporary/scratch file (this is a common error).

Open your csv in Excel for verification! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The R bit:

# query for paired birds

#EDIT:  Libraries
library(data.table)
library(tidyverse)

data <- data.frame(fread("Bird_CSV.csv"))

pair_rows <- contains("pair", vars = data$description)

fem_rows <- contains("fem", vars = data$description)

result <- combine(pair_rows, fem_rows)

result <- data[result,]

write_csv(result, "Paired_Birds.csv")

Tada!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Jess

Solar upgrades!

Solar upgrades!

Incredibly, the hut we are working from actually had another solar panel just laying around.  🙂
This 50w square panel had a junction box with MC4 connectors, the standard for small scale solar installations.  As I was unsure how to know when we are running low on electricity reserves, I decided to make some adjustments.

Additional 50w solar panel

(Everything is still solder, hot glue, alligator clips, and zip-ties I’m afraid…)
I traded my NEMA / USA two-prong connection with two MC4 splitters, such that both panels can run in parallel (into a standard USA 110v extension cord that goes into our hut).  This way we should make well over one of the two 35ah batteries-worth of electricity a day.

Dual MC4 splitters to extension cord

I also added a cheap 12v battery level indicator.  It is not very accurate (as it fluctuates with solar input) but it does give us some insight about how much "juice" we have available.  (I also wired and glued the remote-on switch to the back of the input for stability.)

Added battery indicator and button

🙂
-Jess

840 Watts of Solar Power!

Equipment used:

Inverter/PWM Controller:  http://a.co/fdl9YzI

2x 35ah Batteries: http://a.co/5JBIxTC

100w solar panel:  http://a.co/5JBIxTC

We need power!  While doing bird research in the wilds of northern NH, it became evident we needed electricity to power computers, big cameras, and phones/GPS units.

Below is a table of the system and our expected electricity needs:

System Solar 100w 35ah universal (x2)
Ah per day: 33.33333333 35 TOTAL Ah Reserve: 70
V 12 12 Parallel wiring: 12v
Wh in: 400 420 TOTAL Wh Reserve: 840
W 100
Cost $105.00 $64.00
ah/$ 2
Sun Hour / Multiplier 4 2
Need/Day Wh multiplier consump. in Wh = 259.36
Computer 100 2.5 250
iPhone 1.7 2 3.4
AAs 11.2 0.3 3.36
Camera 2.6 1 2.6

*The milk crate system below can charge a 100 watt MacBook Pro around 8-9 times from being completely empty.  

**Remember:  V*A=W,  W/V=A, and Watts over time is Wh.  

-Jess

+/- relates to size of standard prongs

Parallel maintains 12v but doubles Ah. (Series would go to 24v at 35ah)

 

Intro to the AWS Cloud 9 IDE

The Cloud 9 IDE is the fastest way I have come up with to develop web-based or otherwise "connected" programs.    Because it lives on a Linux-based EC2 server on AWS, running different node, html, etc programs that rely on a network system just work- it is all already on a network anyway.   🙂  There is no downtime trying to figure out your WAMP, MAMP, Apache, or localhost situation.

Similarly, other network programs work just as well-  I am running a MySQL server over here (RDS), storage over there (S3), and have various bits in Github and locally.   Instead of configuring local editors, permissions, and computer ports and whatnot, you are modifying the VPC security policies and IAM groups- though generally, it just works.

Getting going:   The only prerequisite is you have an AWS account.  Students:  get $40 EC2 dollars below:

https://aws.amazon.com/education/awseducate/
Open the cloud 9 tab under services.

 

 

Setup is very fast- just know if others are going to be editing to, understand the IAM policies and what VPC settings you actually want.

 

Know this ideally a browser-based service; I have tried to come up with a reason a SSH connection would be better and didn't get any where.

For one person, micro is fine.   Know these virtual "RAMs" and "CPUs" are generous....

 

 

 

 

The default network settings are set up for you.   This follows good practice for one person; more than that (or if you are perhaps a far-travelling person) note these settings.  They are always editable under the VPC and EC2 instance tabs.

 

 

That's it!   Other use things to know:

This is a linux machine maintained by Amazon.   Packages you think should work and be up to date (arguably like any other linux machine I guess...)  may not be.  Check your basics like the NPM installer and versions of what your going to be working on, it very well may be different than what you are used to.

In the editor:

You have two panels of workspace in the middle- shown is node and HTML.   Everything is managed by tabs- all windows can have as much stuff as you want this way.

Below there is a "runner" (shown with all the default options!) and a terminal window.  Off to the left is a generic file manager.

 

 

I hope this is useful, it sure is great for me.

-Jess

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